Download Free Primary Resource

To get the most out of the School Action Toolkit, remember to purchase the Supplementary Video Kit.
Sorry, GAYBY BABY’s School Action Toolkit is available in Australia only.
Contact us at: info@thegaybyproject.com if you want to find out about how to make GAYBY BABY available at your international school.

Download Free Secondary Resource

To get the most out of the School Action Toolkit, remember to purchase the Supplementary Video Kit.
Sorry, GAYBY BABY’s School Action Toolkit is available in Australia only.
Contact us at: info@thegaybyproject.com if you want to find out about how to make GAYBY BABY available at your international school.

Supplementary Video Kit

This Supplementary Video Kit complements the free, downloadable School Action Toolkit resource which is tailored to meet the achievement standards and content of the Health and Physical Education learning area of the NSW and Australian curriculum for Years 5-10.

The supplementary video kit encourages insightful, manageable conversations based on the real life experiences of children being raised by same-sex attracted parents and explores the universal challenges and transitions that students will go through as they move through adolescence.

The Supplementary Video Kit contains:

  • A 53-minute version of GAYBY BABY
  • A family diversity poster (A2) for display around the school
  • 4 x short character videos:
    – Gus (15 mins)
    – Ebony (19:30 mins)
    – Matt (15 mins)
    – Graham (15 mins)
  • A free copy of the theatrical (85 min) version of GAYBY BABY

Supplementary video kit price:

$89 incl. GST + $10 postage

Extra posters?

Want extra family diversity posters to display at your school or organisation? Click here to purchase a 5 or 10 pack, or save on postage and add the posters to your supplementary video kit order!

5x A2 Posters
$35 incl. GST + $10 postage
10x A2 Posters
$60 incl. GST + $10 postage
Click here to purchase

Complete the form to purchase a supplementary video kit

Fields marked with an * are required

About the school action toolkit

About the toolkit

GAYBY BABY’s School Action Toolkit is linked to the Health and Physical Education learning area of the Australian Curriculum for years 5-10. The resource may also be extended for use in Humanities and English classes.

It includes:

  • Activities & strategies that support teachers, administrators & students to recognise, explore & celebrate the diversity of Australian families.
  • Clear lesson plans and student worksheets.
  • Bright ideas for teachers wishing to extend their classroom experience.
  • Frequently Asked Questions and information pertaining directly to same-sex attracted family units.
  • The activities and lesson plans are designed to complement video stimulus material drawn from GAYBY BABY.

The video stimulus material encourages insightful, manageable conversations based on the real life experiences of children being raised by same-sex parents and explores the universal challenges and transitions that students will go through as they move through adolescence.

Additional Downloads

Passive consent form template
Communicate with parents and carers that you intend to use the GAYBY BABY School Action Toolkit. This ‘passive consent’ template is suitable to include in your school newsletter or in a letter home to parents/carers.
45KB

Download

Colouring sheets
Here are some colouring-in handouts that depict different kinds of families. Print off a range of handouts and let students colour and discuss diverse family structures.
53KB

Download

Toolkit worksheets
All the handouts from the toolkit, in one easy bundle!
3.6MB

Download
Teaching and learning modules mapped to NSW PDHPE K-6 and 7-10 curriculum
Module overviews
Module 1: Years 5 and 6 +-
Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 4 Activity 5
Key Question What is a family? How do our identities make us who we are? How do people and places influence our behaviours and actions? How does the media influence our attitudes, beliefs and behaviours? How can we be respectful in all of our relationships?
Content Links
(direct from NSW curriculum)
Families
  • parental responsibilities and rights
  • sibling dependence
  • mutual dependence
  • rights and responsibilities
Personal Identity
  • influences on self-esteem and behaviour
  • family, friends, community
  • personal abilities
  • increased responsibility
  • media and culture
Influences on Decision Making
  • family/peers
  • other significant people
  • media
  • feelings and needs of others
Personal Identity
  • influences on self-esteem and behaviour
  • family, friends, community
  • personal abilities
  • increased responsibility
  • media and culture
Relationships
  • personal rights
  • rights and responsibilities
  • types of abuse
  • effects of abuse
  • solving problems
  • importance of positive relationships
  • relating to people
Film Links View film (1 hour version might work best for primary schools) Matt’s story
Graham’s story
Ebony's story Gus' story Gus' story
Matt's story
Module 2: Years 7 and 8 +-
Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 4 Activity 5
Key Question Is there more than one way to be a family? What makes a family “normal”? How do our families shape the way we see ourselves in wider society? How can changes and transitions impact on how we feel about ourselves? What makes it easier to manage changes and transitions as you grow older?
Content Links
(direct from HPE curriculum)
Types and Nature of Relationships
  • the importance of family relationships
  • the increasing importance of peers
  • relating appropriately in different relationships and situations
  • factors influencing relationships
Caring and Respectful Relationships
  • qualities of positive relationships
  • rights and responsibilities in relationships
  • listening and accepting opinions of others
  • expressing your own needs
  • appreciating diversity in relationships
Types and Nature of Relationships
  • the importance of family relationships
  • the increasing importance of peers
  • relating appropriately in different relationships and situations
  • factors influencing relationships
A Sense of Self
  • defining a sense of self
  • being the same as and different from others
  • how a sense of self can vary in different contexts
  • factors that influence a sense of self
  • self-acceptance
Adolescence and Change
  • the physical, social and emotional changes during adolescence
  • understanding difference and diversity
Changes and Challenges
  • sources of change and challenge, eg school, family, friendships
  • identifying fears and feelings
Film Links Film trailer Entire film Ebony's story Gus' story
Matt's story
Ebony's story
Graham's story
Module 3: Years 9 and 10 +-
Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 4 Activity 5
Key Question What is a 21st Century family, and how and by whom should it be defined? What roles do we play? What does it feel like to be treated differently? How do families shape who we are and how we view ourselves within wider society? How can we promote and affirm diversity in our community?
Content Links
(direct from HPE curriculum)
Affirming Diversity
  • strength in diversity
  • empathy and understanding
  • respect and trust
  • building inclusion
  • appreciating diversity as normal
  • valuing individual differences and perspectives
The Interdependence Between a Sense of Self and Health and Wellbeing
  • how a sense of self can impact on health and wellbeing
  • how personal health can impact on one’s sense of self
Affirming Diversity
  • strength in diversity
  • empathy and understanding
  • respect and trust
  • building inclusion
  • appreciating diversity as normal
  • valuing individual differences and perspectives
Affirming Diversity
  • strength in diversity
  • empathy and understanding
  • respect and trust
  • building inclusion
  • appreciating diversity as normal
  • valuing individual differences and perspectives
Affirming Diversity
  • strength in diversity
  • empathy and understanding
  • respect and trust
  • building inclusion
  • appreciating diversity as normal
  • valuing individual differences and perspectives
Film Links Entire film Gus' story
Entire film Entire film Entire film

Did you Know?

In the 2011 Census there were:

33,714 same-sex couple
households in Australia

6,120 children living in these households.

That’s double the number of children since the 2001 census, meaning children with same-sex attracted parents are a rapidly growing demographic in our schools.

“I think if this film had been shown and my type of family had been known about at school, I wouldn’t have had to lie. I wouldn’t have had to make up stories about what my family was and who the other woman was who was living with us. School would have been easier. I could have been honest and open with myself and my friends. It would have made a huge difference on my learning as a kid.”
– Jesse, 23 yrs, Gayby

A young person’s family is central to their understanding of their own identity. When students see a family like theirs reflected in their school environment, it increases feelings of validation, safety and acceptance. This positively impacts their academic motivation and social wellbeing1.

Beyond the classroom, the School Action Toolkit encourages a whole school approach to welcoming diverse families in the school community. This is important, as there is an ever-growing demographic of children with same-sex attracted parents and/or non-traditional, ‘modern’ families…

To be a welcoming and safe school, you need to support students from diverse families as you would those from traditional families. The School Action Toolkit provides you with strategies to confidently provide this support.

1 See ‘An Introduction to Welcoming Schools’ (URL below) or read the toolkit for full list of academic papers which detail the social, educational and emotional benefits of inclusive classrooms; http://www.hrc.org/files/images/general/An_Introduction_to_Welcoming_Schools.pdf

Did you Know?

What is a modern family? The structure and composition of Australian families is rapidly changing across the board. Some children are experiencing a number of family transitions and structures before they reach adolescence. Statistics (2009-2010) on Australian families indicate:

Write A Letter To The Kids In The Film

Were you surprised or moved by GAYBY BABY? Did you learn something from the kids featured in the School Action Toolkit? Here, you can get your students to share their thoughts and feelings in a letter to Gus, Ebony, Matt or Graham. This is also the final extension activity in the School Action Toolkit.

Q: Will they really see my letter?
A: Yes – we will make sure!

Q: I’ve seen the film but I haven’t studied the School Action Toolkit, can I still write a letter?
A: Absolutely – and please let your teacher know about the resource and direct them to this page!

Letters written:

27